9 February 2017

“You like me and I like you”

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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19 January 2017

2017…the year of the rooster, Trump and flying cars

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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1 March 2017

Boeing comes to Sheffield

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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3 November 2016

China shows its air power

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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29 March 2017

China to build UAVs in Saudi Arabia

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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8 July 2016

Civil wars abating

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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27 October 2016

Consolidation in the Cyber market

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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17 February 2017

Court room dramas

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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11 January 2017

Cyber wars

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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1 December 2016

F-35 funding in chaos

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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24 May 2017

FY18 US Defense Budget

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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4 August 2016

Have you heard of GKN?

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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1 November 2016

It pays to be civil in the long run

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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2 September 2016

New tanker and fighter jet ready for take off

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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15 February 2017

Russian Roulette

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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15 September 2016

The 'special' relationship?

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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15 July 2016

The rain fell mainly on the planes

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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21 February 2017

Trump soldiers on

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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3 January 2017

Trump wants to defeat ISIS and eliminate budget caps

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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7 December 2016

Trump's new security team

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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12 July 2016

Trumping Clinton on defence spending

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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13 March 2017

US budget battles

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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3 May 2017

US strikes budget deal to end six month long Continuing Resolution

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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23 August 2016

What does the future hold for NATO?

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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6 December 2016

Who's the daddy?

Not as radical a departure from Obama as the headlines suggest

President Trump released his first full US Defense Budget yesterday. It requests a base budget of $574bn for FY18, and $65bn in Overseas Contingency Operations funding (OCO), making a total request of $639bn (as shown in the chart below). This would be a 3% increase year on year, and it is 3% higher than Obama requested for FY18. Whilst I acknowledge that the market environment looks better for the defence industry under the Republicans compared to the Democrats, I think the headlines this morning are focusing on the bullish rhetoric rather than understanding the nuances of the numbers. This budget is positive for the overall trajectory of defence spending and there is clearly going to be a focus on providing good equipment for troops, However, most of the uplift is consumed by higher troop costs and the Budget Control Act means there is uncertainty over whether this budget will ever come to fruition. In today’s blog I examine what I consider to be the three key questions; what has changed in this budget from Obama’s plans? Where will the extra money be spent? And how likely is it that the proposed budget is enacted by Congress?

US base defence budget and Overseas Contingency Operations funding ($m) FY01 – FY22 (Source: FY17 DoD Green Book & FY18 Budget materials)

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